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Course Offerings

Ethnic Studies

 

* These courses meet the requirements for general education

† These courses meets all Title 5 standards for transfers to CSU, UC Associate Degree Credit

 

 

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ETHN-107*†

 

Hist of Race/Ethnicity in US


3 Credits

 

An introduction to the historical and socio-cultural experiences of racial and ethnic groups and their roles in shaping society and culture in the United States, from pre-contact to the present. Focus will be on migration, colonization, racialization, discrimination, assimilation, social stratification, liberation movements, and the intersection of racial, ethnic, gender, sexual identities as they relate to African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinas/os/x, Native Americans, and Middle Eastern Americans.

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-114*†  


Intro to Race & Ethnicity

 

3 Credits

 

An introduction to the sociological analysis of ethnicity, race, and immigration in a global context. Topics include the history of racialized groups in the United States, patterns of interaction between racial and ethnic groups, colonialism, immigration, identity formation, prejudice, discrimination, ethnocentrism, racism, institutional racism, social movements for civil rights, liberation and decolonization, and the intersection of race and ethnicity with social class, gender and other forms of difference and stratification.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

 

ETHN-115*†

 

Intro to Cultural Competence

 

3 Credits

 

Achieving cultural competency is a process, and this course provides a framework to begin critical reflection, knowledge acquisition, dialogue and best practices that lead to cultural competence over time. Students begin their work toward cultural competency. Students gain skills to effectively interact with people of diverse cultures, languages, socio-economic classes, races, ethnic backgrounds, religions, sexual and gender orientations, special needs and other social identities. The course explores attitudes, behavior, institutions and policies. It examines privilege and oppression, intersectionality of identities, various groups' barriers to equal access and opportunity, and how cultural competence moves people and institutions toward practices of inclusiveness.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-118*†  

 

Chicano/Chicana Perspectives I

 

3 Credits

 

This course is designed to explore the role and development of the Chicana/o (Mexican American) people in the history of the United States. It examines United States history with emphasis on institutions and ideals, beginning with pre-Colombian Meso-America to the Mexican-American War (1848). Social, economic, political and cultural events are covered with attention to Mexican/Chicana/o people in the United States. The Constitution of the United States and the operation of representative government are studied with special emphasis on the impact and effects of U.S.-Mexico relations and their people.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-119*†

 

Chicano/Chicana Perspectives II

 

3 Credits

 

This course is designed to explore the role and development of the Chicana/o (Mexican American) people in the history of the United States. Beginning with the Mexican-American War (1848) to the present period, institutions and ideals of the United States history are examined, with emphasis on the social economic, political and cultural implications to Chicana/o people in the United States. The U.S. Constitution, operation of representative government, and developments in California state and local government are studied with special emphasis on the impact and effects on Chicana/o's.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-125*†  

 

Cross-Cultural Psychology

 

3 Credits

 

An introduction to theories and research findings regarding cultural influences on human behavior and cognitive processes (life-span development, abnormal behavior and mental health, drug use, self-concept, emotion, social behavior, perception, learning, intelligence, and memory). By providing students with a non-judgmental understanding of how culture influences human behavior, this course will make them more equipped to interact in a world where there is increasing contact among different cultures.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-126*†

 

Chicana/0 and Mexican Art

 

3 Credits

 

Comprehensive overview of the major influences and themes in Chicana/o art from its emergence in the 1960s to the beginning of the 21st century. Emphasis is placed on the historical (including pre-Columbian and Mexican), social, political and cultural context of the Chicana/o Movement and murals, prints, sculpture, literature, and performance.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

 

ETHN-127*†

 

La Chicana

 

3 Credits

 

A study of Chicanas/Latinas through the written and visual images conveyed by Chicanas/Latinas and non-Chicanas/non-Latinas over time. Myths about Chicanas/Latinas are examined in a variety of contexts. Attention will be given to the evolution of the literary, visual, cultural, political and socio-economic experience of Chicanas and Latinas

 

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-128*†  

 

Intro to Chicana/O Studies

 

3 Credits

 

This course is an introduction to Mexicana/o-Chicana/o culture and identity in the United States viewed through the lens of the origins, evolution, and current status of Chicana/o studies. Explores the research, theories, methods and debates in, and impact of, the field. Examines current intellectual trends, scholar activism, societal developments and the issues affecting Mexicana/o-Chicana/o communities. The course is taught from a multidisciplinary approach using the scholarship of Chicano Studies, the social sciences, visual arts, drama, history, literature, and music.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-130*†

 

Native American Perspectives I

 

3 Credits

 

This course covers the social, political, cultural, economic and intellectual history of indigenous people in North America from pre-history to pre-Civil War in United States. Native experiences are placed in the context of the evolution of diverse native nations, within the growth of the U.S., and within the development of American institutions and ideals. California and San Diego County nations are highlighted, as is the origins of the U.S. Constitution and its evolving interpretation in the courts regarding native nations.

 

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-131*†

 

Native American Perspectives II

 

3 Credits

 

This course covers the social, political, cultural, economic, and intellectual history of indigenous groups in North America from 1850 to the present. Areas of focus include: Native American perspectives of native and non-native cultures, the portrayal and influence of Native Americans in popular culture, the influence of Native Americans on the California State Constitution and government, the impact of State and Federal legislation on Native Americans, and Native American agency and resistance movements in the struggle for civil and political rights and indigenous sovereignty. Also listed as HIST 131. Not open to students with credit in HIST 131.
 
 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

 

ETHN-134*†

 

Intro to American Indian Art

 

3 Credits

 

The study of prehistoric, historic and modern creative art forms of American Indians. This course investigates the origins of American Indian art from rock paintings to contemporary artists and artisans. The class compares and contrasts art forms said to be Native American in content and Native American artists creating contemporary art in European-based art forms. American Indian art is explored within the context of American Indian Studies--from legal, cultural, anthropological, and fine arts perspectives and as a means of adaptation and resistance to colonialization and government policies.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-135*†  

 

SD County Americn Indian Tribes

 

3 Credits

 

This course discusses the cultural complexity of indigenous San Diego County Indians, spanning geographically from the ocean to the mountains and desert. San Diego County has 18 Indian Reservations, more than any county in the United States. The course examines pre-contact, migration/relocation patterns, present day reservations, and an in-depth study of the dominant Hokan speakers (Kumeyaay-Diegueño) and of the three groups of Uto-Aztecan speakers (Luiseño, Cahuilla and Cupeño). The history of these groups includes the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods resulting in forced removals and loss of traditional territories and altered traditions. Also covered is each group's origins, traditional songs, oral tradition, religious practices, foods, family patterns, and how they have survived and maintained their language, arts and culture. The course evaluates how the tribes shaped ancient and modern San Diego, including the socio-economic and political importance of gaming tribes and sovereignty.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-137*†

 

Amercn Indian Culture/Heritage

 

3 Credits

 

An in-depth analysis and discussion of American Indian cultural development as influenced by native and non-native traditions and influences. This course will examine the ways in which American Indians view the world, their place in it, and their responsibilities to it within an ethno-environmental context. Emphasis is placed on tribal and family relationships and social adjustments made by individuals. Analyzes the influence of these traditions on non-Indian cultures and philosophy, sociopolitics, science, religion, and the arts. Deals with the ongoing adaptability and endurance of American Indian traditions and customs given the changing conditions or legal requirements of the times.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-138*†  

 

History & Cultures-Ca Indians

 

3 Credits

 

Historical overview of California native people and their timeless cultural elements. Included are an investigation into pre-European contact cultures and the subsequent impact of Spanish Missions and Anglo-American colonialism and institutions and values. With over 100 federally recognized California tribes, examples comprise diverse peoples in Northern, Central, and Southern California, including language survival and cultural revitalization. Included are the impact of tribes on the economy today, culture and politics of state-Native relations, significance to tribes and their neighbors of gaming, and myths vs. realities of Native life and culture.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-143*†

 

Images of Black Women

 

3 Credits

 

Historical overview of California native people and their timeless cultural elements. Included are an investigation into pre-European contact cultures and the subsequent impact of Spanish Missions and Anglo-American colonialism and institutions and values. With over 100 federally recognized California tribes, examples comprise diverse peoples in Northern, Central, and Southern California, including language survival and cultural revitalization. Included are the impact of tribes on the economy today, culture and politics of state-Native relations, significance to tribes and their neighbors of gaming, and myths vs. realities of Native life and culture.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-144*†

 

Comm Studies: Race & Ethnicity

 

3 Credits

 

This course provides both a theoretical and a practical exploration of communication, race, and ethnicity in the general context of U.S. culture, with a focus on race and ethnicity in popular culture and the arts. Attention is given to how contemporary and historical constructions of race and ethnicity influence both popular and everyday communication interactions. Emphasis is on developing communication competence in situations where perceived racial or ethnic difference factors into successful communication outcomes.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-145*†


Introduction to Black Studies

 

3 Credits

 

An overview of Black Studies as a discipline, including its socio-political and academic origins, evolution of ideas, methodologies, and goals. Subject areas include history, politics, and economics; social systems; oppression and empowerment; family and community; identity; and contemporary issues. Scholarship, literature, media, and the arts illustrate the interdisciplinary approach to studying black experiences, behavior and thought.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-150*†

 

Latinx Sociology

 

3 Credits

 

This course is an in-depth sociological examination of Latinx/Hispanic communities in the United States. Topics include family structure, gender roles and sexuality; religion; economics; racism; social movements; U.S./Mexico border issues and immigration policy; and education. Emphasis is placed on social interactions, politics of identity formation, and social processes impacting the status of U.S. Latinx/Hispanics. This course is intended for sociology majors or any student interested in the social sciences.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-160*†

U.S. History:  AAPI Perspective

 

3 Credits

 

This course is an in-depth sociological examination of Latinx/Hispanic communities in the United States. Topics include family structure, gender roles and sexuality; religion; economics; racism; social movements; U.S./Mexico border issues and immigration policy; and education. Emphasis is placed on social interactions, politics of identity formation, and social processes impacting the status of U.S. Latinx/Hispanics. This course is intended for sociology majors or any student interested in the social sciences.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-180*†

U.S. History Black Perspectives

 

3 Credits

 

A survey of United States history from colonial times through the Civil War from the perspective and experiences of African-Americans. The course begins with the historical backdrop of African peoples in continental Africa and the trace their story through early modern European contact, slave trade, enslavement in the Americas, colonial America, the revolutionary and Constitutional era, the early Republic, participation in American institutions, sectional issues between North and South over slavery, the Civil War and emancipation. Examines the contradictions, paradoxes and constitutional challenges of the American experiment of freedom alongside the institution of slavery. Explores the political, social, economic, legalistic, cultural, spiritual, literary and artistic life of African-Americans during this historical period.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-181*†

 

U.S. History Black Perspectives II

 

3 Credits

 

A survey of United States history from Reconstruction to the present seen from the perspective and experience of African-Americans. The course begins with the emancipation of slaves and Reconstruction and then traces the African-American experience through modern American history. Topics include developments in California, Reconstruction, Jim Crow South, late 19th century, pre-WWI and the Progressive Era, WWI and the Roaring 20s, Depression Era, WWII and the home front, post-WWII era and segregation, Civil Rights Era, struggles of the 1960s and 1970s, late 20th century and 21st -century issues. Course also explores the contradictions, paradoxes and constitutional challenges, both federal and in California, of the American experiment of equality alongside racial segregation and injustices. The course also explores the political, social, economic, legalistic, cultural, spiritual, literary and artistic life of African-Americans during modern American history.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-194*†

 

Community Service Learning Exp

 

1 Credit

 

Community Service Learning Experience (CSLE) is a community outreach program which promotes the national agenda of volunteer engagement. The purpose is to provide students the opportunity to explore options and careers in a selected area of study.

 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

ETHN-236*†

 

Chicana/o Literature

 

3 Credits

 

This course is a survey of colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary Chicano/Chicana literature. Literary works originally written in English and the Chicano/a bilingual idiom as well as English translations of works written in Spanish will be taught. Reading selections may consist of poetry, ballads, short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction prose. Students analyze the literature and apply critical theory to describe critical events in the histories, cultures, and intellectual and literary traditions, with special focus on the lived experiences, social struggles, and contributions of Latino/a Americans in the United States.
 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-237*†

 

American Indian Literature

 

3 Credits

 

A survey and literary analysis of American Indian literature; folk, creation and origin stories, legends, and poetry from the oral tradition to contemporary American Indian authors.
 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None

 

 

ETHN-238*†

 

Black Literature

 

3 Credits

 

This course introduces students to a survey of Black literature, focusing on the early oral tradition, literature of slavery and freedom, the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, the Black Arts Era, and the contemporary period. Reading selections may consist of poetry, short stories, plays, novels, and nonfiction prose, including essays, letters, political tracts, autobiographies, speeches, and sermons. Students analyze the literature and apply critical theory to describe critical events in the histories, cultures, and intellectual and literary traditions, with special focus on the lived experiences, social struggles, and contributions of African Americans in the United States.
 

Grading:

Letter & Pass/No Pass


Requisites:

None