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Philosophy, Humanities and Religious Studies
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Philosophy Courses

PHILOSOPHY 110 †
A General Introduction to Philosophy
3 units, 3 hours lecture
All human beings ask philosophical questions: Is there any purpose to my existence? Is it possible to have knowledge about the world which is certain? How do I know if my actions are right or wrong? Does God exist? This course explores fundamental philosophical issues and examines the answers provided by philosophers, past and present.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC
(CAN PHIL 2)

PHILOSOPHY 112 †
The Classical Mind
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Classical philosophy is concerned with the emergence of what we understand as a systematic attempt to grasp the nature of humanity and the world. This study is an exploration of the significant figures and movements within Greek philosophy and surveys the ideas that have shaped and guided Western
civilization for 2500 years. 
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 114 †
The Medieval Mind
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Medieval philosophy begins with the decline of classical thought and ends in the 16th century. It is distinguished by an attempt to incorporate classical philosophy, predominately Plato and Aristotle, into the doctrine of Christianity. The medieval (scholastic) school of philosophy focuses on the relation between philosophy and theology.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 116 †
The Modern Mind
3 units, 3 hours lecture
The Modern Mind surveys the significant philosophers and theories beginning with the Renaissance and
continuing through the nineteenth century, from Descartes to Kant. This period of ideas coincides with the
development of the scientific method and the discovery of the new world. The study presents the growth of modern ideas and the response to the new world. It attends to the problem of how humanity, with its system of values, fits into a world of neutral, indifferent facts.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 118 †
The Contemporary Mind
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Contemporary philosophy is an effort to trace new paths of meaning when traditional sources (religion, science, and society) are questioned. This course is a survey of the major trends in philosophy in the late 19th and 20th centuries. It also examines the recent developments in the early 21st century. Two of the most significant schools of thought are 1) the analytic movement of Moore, Russell, and Wittgenstein and
2) the existential/phenomenological thought of Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 125 †
Critical Thinking
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Introduction to critical thinking with emphasis on analyzing and constructing both inductive and deductive
arguments. Critical reasoning will be applied to a variety of situations such as making sound decisions, evaluating claims and assertions, and avoiding fallacious reasoning. 
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College A3; CSU A3
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 130 †
Logic
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Logic is the study of the principles of correct reasoning, dealing with the criteria of critical judgment and the conditions of rational thought, and is comprised of both deductive and inductive inference structures. The study is concerned with the employment of rational criteria in the evaluation of opinions and prospective beliefs and with the application of critical habits of thought to the practical problems of human existence.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College A3; CSU A3
Transfers to: CSU, UC
(CAN PHIL 6)

PHILOSOPHY 140 †
Problems in Ethics
3 units, 3 hours lecture
This is the study of ethics in theory and in practice. This study involves the exploration of moral theories and principles to see how they affect the individual and society. The major schools of moral thought in Western philosophy, as well as some in Eastern philosophy, are critically examined. These theories will be applied to some of the primary ethical dilemmas that human beings, as individuals and as societies, must confront.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC
(CAN PHIL 4)

PHILOSOPHY 141 †
Moral Problems in Health Care
3 units, 3 hours lecture
This is a course in moral theory and practice as it relates to problems encountered in health care. The first
component of this course deals with major schools of ethical theory, focusing on the prominent theories in Western philosophy from classical to contemporary. The second component is an investigation of moral issues that arise in the area of health care. Students receive a solid foundation in ethics as well as a thorough study of the issues and situations which are unique to health care.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2
Transfers to CSU

PHILOSOPHY 150 †
Human Beings and Aesthetic Value
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Human beings make aesthetic judgments every day. Why do we decide that something is either beautiful
or ugly? What criteria do we use to decide if a movie is good or not? Do our likes and dislikes connect to moral and intellectual judgments? This course is an introduction to major theories in aesthetics designed to help the students clarify and evaluate their own aesthetic judgments.
Satisfies General Education for: Grossmont College C1; CSU C2; IGETC 3B
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 155 †
The Philosophy of Science
3 units, 3 hours lecture
Philosophy of science is a branch of epistemology (theory of knowledge) which deals with the truths of science. As a theory of knowledge it asks what it means for a theory to be “true,” and how does science yield knowledge? It is an investigation into the nature and methods of scientific reasoning, in order to evaluate the truth claims of science. It also forces us to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific
methodology
Transfers to: CSU, UC

PHILOSOPHY 199
Special Studies or Projects in Philosophy
1-3 units, 3-9 hours
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Individual study, research or projects in the field of philosophy under instructor guidance. Written reports and periodic conferences required. Content and unit credit to be determined by student/instructor conferences and/or division.
May be repeated for a maximum of nine units.

PHILOSOPHY 299
Selected Topics in Philosophy
1-3 units, 3-9 hours
Prerequisite: Varies with topic.
Selected topics in philosophy not covered by regular catalog offerings. Course content and unit credit to be determined by the Division of Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences and International Programs in relation to community/student need(s) and/or available staff. May be offered as a seminar or lecture class.


† This course meets all Title 5 standards for Associate Degree Credit.

Last Updated: 09/18/2014
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