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7/4/2012 12:30am, LHC announces 5 sigma 126.5 GeV Higg's Boson - it's been discovered officially
7/2/2012 Tevatron scoups LHC, Higg's Boson found (@125 GeV)!!! LHC Announcement follows on July 4, 2012
6/5/2012: The Transit of Venus photos...
 
Access to our faculty offices corridor is thru the door labeled
34-162 at the north west corner on the ground floor of building 34.
Our computer/tutoring lab is located in 34-108. Log
Contact (619) 644-7314 for information.
 
Image randomly chosen from Astronomy Picture Of The Day ( 2008 December 27 ) archives
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081227.html

Explanation:
The Crab Pulsar, a city-sized, magnetized neutron star spinning 30 times a second, lies at the center of this remarkable image from the orbiting Chandra Observatory. The deep x-ray image gives the first clear view of the convoluted boundaries of the Crab's pulsar wind nebula. Like a cosmic dynamo the pulsar powers the x-ray emission. The pulsar's energy accelerates charged particles, producing eerie, glowing x-ray jets directed away from the poles and an intense wind in the equatorial direction. Intriguing edges are created as the charged particles stream away, eventually losing energy as they interact with the pulsar's strong magnetic field. With more mass than the Sun and the density of an atomic nucleus, the spinning pulsar itself is the collapsed core of a massive star. The stellar core collapse resulted in a supernova explosion that was witnessed in the year 1054. This Chandra image spans just under 9 light-years at the Crab's estimated distance of 6,000 light-years.

Note : APOD Editor to Speak in New York on Jan. 2