CSIS 110 Syllabus

Catalog Course Description:               

A course to develop basic knowledge of computers and information systems.  The broad overview of topics includes computer organization, hardware and software, systems, computer programming, and applications software. The lab portion of the course will consist of hands-on problem solving using software tools such as word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software.  

Instructor:        Clifton Quinn

Office/Phone:      510- B / 644-7485

Email address:     clifton.quinn@gcccd.edu

Office Hours: see online schedule

     (or any day by appointment as necessary)

Class Location: Lab: Room 532

Course Textbooks: Two books are required for this class.  One deals with general Computer Concepts, one is for Microsoft Office 2013.   For these books you can choose the e-book option or buy a physical book. These are available in the Grossmont College bookstore, offered as a bundle. You will NEED to have the e-book and both the "Connect" and "SimNet" course access codes.  This will be discussed during the first day of class.

The "bundle", from the Campus Bookstore, also includes the physical Microsoft Office 2013 textbook, a 180-day version of Microsoft Office 2013 Professional software, as well as access to the online tools. 

1. Computing Essentials 2014 - Making IT work for you, O'Leary, Complete.

2. Microsoft® Office 2013: In Practice, 1st Edition, Nordell. McGraw Hill.

Always have a scantron (DataLink 26760) available for each class. We will use about five during the semester.

Student learning Outcome(s): students successfully completing this course should be able to:

1. Demonstrate proficiency by selecting and using the appropriate general categories of application software to solve specific business problems.

2. Describe the use of computer technology and its impact on society and the way business is conducted.

3. Understand the importance of the technology infrastructure in an organization; identify the hardware and software components of a computer system and interdependency of both.

1.  Course Goals

a. Students will understand, conceptually, how a computer system operates and how peripheral equipment is utilized to make a complete "system".

b. Students will understand and appreciate the advantages and the problems inherent in business data/information processing in our society.

c. Students will appreciate the differences between large, medium, and personal computer systems, as well as what computer systems can and cannot do.

d. Students will learn to use a word processing program, a spreadsheet program, a data base program and the fundamentals of using presentation software.

2. Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

- Describe and discuss the evolution of computers in terms of a series of steps that meet the needs of society and its organizations for computational and data processing capabilities.

- Describe and discuss the importance of data as a business asset and the place of computer information systems capabilities within the modern business organization.

- Identify the basic parts and functions of information systems.

- Identify the devices that comprise a computer system and describe the functions of each as well as the interrelationships.

- Describe the need for and functions of a formal "systems development" methodology.

- Describe and discuss the role and functions of systems software.

- Describe and discuss the principles of organization and management for an Information Systems department in a large business organization.

- Identify and be able to discuss some issues faced by the information systems profession, including the topics of security and privacy of data resources.

- Demonstrate ability to use (a) a word processing program to produce a multi-page document, (b) a spreadsheet to solve an analysis problem of some degree, as well as delve into the topic of creating advanced formulas and macros, (c) a database program to create a table, input data into the table and query the table to retrieve specified records from the table, and (d) presentation software to create a multi-page presentation.

3. Course Contents

- An Introduction to Computers
- Application Software
- Input to the Computer
- The Processor Unit and system Unit Hardware
- Output from the Computer
- File Organization and Databases
- Data Communications
- Operating Systems and Systems Software
- Systems Analysis and Design
- Computer Programming and Languages
- Career Opportunities
- Privacy and Ethics
- Trends and Issues in the Information Age

"Applications" content: - Using Microsoft Office 2013

- Introduction to Windows

- Word Processing Using Microsoft Word

- Spreadsheets Using Excel

- Database Management Using Microsoft Access

-  Presentations with PowerPoint

4. Evaluation

a. The student will be expected to demonstrate a basic understanding of the course objectives by obtaining a passing grade on text quizzes, lab assignments, exercises and examinations.  Reading quizzes may be given after each text chapter is completed; one quiz per week.  Special exercises and small projects will be given on a regular basis to assist student understanding of key concepts.

b. The course grade will be based upon the distribution of total points earned on examinations, quizzes, lab assignments, and exercises.

c. Grading distribution will consist of: (Note: this may change during the semester as we have first-hand experience with both the "Connect" and "SimNet" systems.

"Connect" Activities

30%

Final Exam

10%

Hands-on Exams (Office)

15%

Quizzes/Participation

15%

Microsoft Office Tasks

30%

Total

100%


CSIS 110 Grade scale

d. The grading scale will be:

A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%

D = 60 - 69%
F =  0 - 59%

Note: Plus and Minus grades may be assigned. This will be up to the discretion of the instructor, and grades will be assigned accordingly for the lower and upper 2.4% of each group. Example, 80-82.4 = B- and 87.5-89.9 = B+. There will not be any grades assigned of C-, D+ or D-.

e. There will be a brief oral presentation during the semester required, counted the same weight as one quiz (not dropped).

f. Final exam date: As stated in Course Schedule.

5. Attendance Requirements & Drop Policy

a. As required by the administration of Grossmont College, attendance will be taken during each class.  Attendance is not explicitly considered in determining a student's grade.  However, since material covered in each class often builds on subjects treated in previous classes, students missing a class early in the semester may have trouble catching up in the course.

b. It is the responsibility of the student desiring to drop the course to turn in the necessary drop forms, BY THE PUBLISHED DROP DATE.  The instructor will not necessarily drop students who are no longer attending class, but reserves the right to drop students who have missed the equivalent of two weeks of class or are more than two weeks behind on assignments.

c. If students know that they might have to miss a class, they should notify the instructor in advance and make arrangements to find out the nature of future lecture material and assignments.  In any case, it is the student's responsibility to study lecture or lab material covered in missed classes as obtained from a fellow student and complete all assignments.  The instructor should be consulted immediately if particular problems ensue.

d. There will be no make-up exams.  Late homework will not be accepted.  If you must miss an exam, let me know in advance.  The scoring for any late exams, if approved and with immediate notification, subject to 10% penalty.

6. Methods of Instruction

a. Classes will consist of interactive lectures, hardware and software demonstrations, in-class microcomputer application exercises and projects, quizzes and examinations.  Students will get "hands-on" experience in the usage of using word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software applications, as they relate to "real world" tasks as well as an introduction to accessing data on the Internet.  Students will become thoroughly familiar with relevant hardware and software systems available in the microcomputer labs.  Students should expect to work hard, concentrate seriously, and participate regularly during class.

b. In this course, it will be assumed that the student has no significant background in computer science and data processing.  As a result, a strong foundation based on fundamental concepts must be developed during the first few weeks of the course.

c. The amount of material and number of subject areas to be covered in a course of this nature is significant.  As a result, the amount of class time allocated for this course will be fully utilized and the student should endeavor to participate fully.

d. The instructor will be available to answer student questions, help with individual problems, and cover troublesome material throughout each class and during office hours. Students having problems should not hesitate to consult the instructor as soon as possible.  Many times a few moments of consultation will help a student get quickly moving forward in the course.

e. It has been found that one best learns how to use a computer by sitting down, committing one's body and mind, and using the computer, not simply by reading and taking exams.  Since it is the objective of this course to develop in a student the ability to utilize the computer in a business environment, the student may reasonably expect to be assigned meaningful projects progressing from relatively simple to more complex.

f. Because of the nature of using a micro-computer application, a sizable amount of lab time working with a PC will be required of each student (average of 3 to 6 hours per week). Actual student lab time will depend on such factors as prior computing experience, typing speed, and regular study at home.

** Accommodations for Students with Disabilities
Students with disabilities who may need accommodations in this class are encouraged to notify the instructor and contact Disabled Student Services & Programs (DSP&S) early in the semester so that reasonable accommodations may be implemented as soon as possible. Students may contact DSP&S in person in room 110 or by phone at (619) 644-7112 (7119 is TTY for deaf).

Planned Semester Course Timeline: (subject to change) - All assignments and dates will be listed in the Blackboard course management system.

Week

Topic

Chapter

Lab work

1

Introduction to Computers

1

Word/Windows

2

The Internet

2

Word

3

Application Software

3

Word

4

System Software

4

Excel

5

System Unit Hardware

 5

Excel

6

Input Devices

6

Excel

7

Output Devices

6

Excel

8

Data Storage

7

Excel

9

Communications and Networks

8

Excel

10

Privacy Security and Ethics

 9

Excel

11

Information Systems

10

PowerPoint

12

Information Systems

10

Access

13

 Databases and File management

11

Access

14

Systems Analysis and Design

12

Access

15

Programming and Languages

13

Access

16

Web Development

13

HTML/Web

17

Final Exam

 

 

Weekly Schedule

Added from Grossmont College:

Grossmont College Policy on Cheating and Plagiarism:

Cheating and plagiarism (using as one's own ideas writings, materials, or images of someone else without acknowledgement or permission) can result in any one of a variety of sanctions. Such penalties may range from an adjusted grade on the particular exam, paper, project, or assignment (all of which may lead to a failing grade in the course) to, under certain conditions, suspension or expulsion from a class, program or the college.  For further clarification and information on these issues, please consult with your instructor or contact the office of the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.